leather

Bronc Tack, O’Neill Rodeo

Bareback Tack, O'Neill Rodeo

Bronc Tack, O’Neill Rodeo

Just like my friend Melinda Green Harvey, I like lines, but especially those with varied textures, symbolism, and tones. I studied the tack neatly organized on the back fence of the chutes for some time, waiting for the light and the horses in the corral behind to line up properly, and then made this shot.

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Boot No. 1

Boot No. 1

Boot No. 1

I’ll return to Cathy Hervert. There are two more images from the shoot to publish, but since variety is the spice of life (sorry for the cliche), I wanted to send this out first. I’ve long been fascinated with the textures of leather and the textures of lives, and decided on using well-traveled boots to interweave the two ideas.

Tough Hands No. 4

Tough Hands No. 4

Tough Hands No. 4

Jim had great hands.

James Stanfield, a National Geographic photographer, once noted how a crowd would have only a few classic faces within it, and I think this extends to hands. As a result, I often begin looking at hands and faces when I’m presented with a new venue, and at my last branding–a large one with more than 35 people working–I found several of each.

Back to Jim. He was castrating calves for part of the morning, and would come back to the antiseptic bucket near the fire to clean his hands and knife. It had been deeply overcast and cold early, and nearly everyone wore gloves, so I missed Jim’s gnarled, strong, creased hands. But near 9 a.m., the weather had warmed, and the gloves came off. And I found hands.