color

Girl and Mural

Girl and Mural

Girl and Mural

On seeing the mural, the girl’s coat integral in the dance, I couldn’t help but hear Emily Dickinson, and make pictures.

I cannot dance upon my Toes—
No Man instructed me—
But oftentimes, among my mind,
A Glee possesseth me,

That had I Ballet knowledge—
Would put itself abroad
In Pirouette to blanch a Troupe—
Or lay a Prima, mad,

And though I had no Gown of Gauze—
No Ringlet, to my Hair,
Nor hopped to Audiences—like Birds,
One Claw upon the Air,

Nor tossed my shape in Eider Balls,
Nor rolled on wheels of snow
Till I was out of sight, in sound,
The House encore me so—

Nor any know I know the Art
I mention—easy—Here—
Nor any Placard boast me—
It’s full as Opera—

 

 

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The PlainSky, Nebraskans Show: The Complete Works No. 15

Embroidery Cottons: PlainSky Nebraskans No. 15

Embroidery Cottons: PlainSky Nebraskans No. 15

One of the showcase images in the PlainSky, Nebraskans gallery, “Embroidery Cottons, Sioux County” (like nearly all my images) is a metaphor that has led many to speculate on its possible meanings. But like most artists, I leave the answer a secret, and the audience is left to ponder.

Black and White v. Color, Part Deux: Young Man’s Boots, Harrison

Let’s try this again. I have to extend my thanks to everyone who was kind enough to offer his or her opinion on the Bales and Storm; it was nice to have genuine feedback on what people prefer in a photograph!

So here’s one more opportunity to say, “Hey Brett, I like…” Which is better: the color boots, or the black and white?

Young Man Boots Color

Young Man’s Boots (Color)

Young Man's Boots, Harrison

Young Man’s Boots (Black and White)

 

PlainSky, Nebraskans Bales and Storm: Color or Black and White?

I’ll be honest. I’m shocked about the response to Bales and Storm: The photograph had laid ignored in a folder, and I skipped over it several times, saying, “Meh, it’s nothing anyone will find interesting.” Clearly, I should be “taken out back of the barn and shot.”

Yesterday, after raving about how much she liked the Bales and Storm black and white image, someone talked with me about whether or not I had the image in color; I said no, since my landscapes in the PlainSky, Nebraskans project have been exclusively black and white images. But, in the interest of discussion, I prepped a color version, and am posting the two images here for comparison. Tell me what you think.

Bales and Storm (Color)

Bales and Storm (Color)

Bales and Storm (Black and White)

Bales and Storm (Black and White)

Great Springs, Montana

Great Springs, Montana

Great Springs, Montana

Following the Lewis and Clark trail to the Pacific, I came across these striations in the stone at the Great Springs that the expedition visited some 200 years ago, and made an image of the textures of rock, water and light as they interacted in the evening.

Maple Leaves, Iron City, Colorado

Maple Leaves, Iron City

Colorado is known for its aspens, its mountains and its skiing, among other things; maple trees, especially at the higher altitudes, don’t often get much press. One June, as I drove the Iron City road in central Colorado, I found this lone maple tree with a branch highlighted in diffused light from a cloudy sky. The red stems perfectly complemented the new green leaves’ color, and from that spot came this image.

Mineral Deposits and Yellowstone Lake, Yellowstone

Mineral Deposits and Yellowstone Lake

Mineral Deposits and Yellowstone Lake

Regardless of the time of year, Yellowstone makes for great images.  Every time I’m in the park, I find new places, new opportunities, and new vision, and during a summer storm, I did the best thing a photographer can do: turned my back on that which everyone else was staring. Instead, as the tiny trickle of hot water left the hot pool for the cold waters of Yellowstone lake, it created a new barrage of colors; blue, green, brown, orange melded together in a textural composition of rock, cloud and water.

Detail, The Cascades, Chalk Creek, Colorado

Detail, The Cascades

Detail, The Cascades

I’ve been visiting The Cascades since I was a small boy, so my photographic fascination with them is a lifetime marriage; they change each year as the snow melt moves huge boulders, reshapes eddies and reroutes the creek.  This lichen-covered stone was there last summer, but I expect it’s not one I’ll see again.

I used a long exposure with a neutral density filter to capture the movement of the creek, as well as the red evening light bouncing off the enclosing canyon walls.