birds

Girl and Mural

Girl and Mural

Girl and Mural

On seeing the mural, the girl’s coat integral in the dance, I couldn’t help but hear Emily Dickinson, and make pictures.

I cannot dance upon my Toes—
No Man instructed me—
But oftentimes, among my mind,
A Glee possesseth me,

That had I Ballet knowledge—
Would put itself abroad
In Pirouette to blanch a Troupe—
Or lay a Prima, mad,

And though I had no Gown of Gauze—
No Ringlet, to my Hair,
Nor hopped to Audiences—like Birds,
One Claw upon the Air,

Nor tossed my shape in Eider Balls,
Nor rolled on wheels of snow
Till I was out of sight, in sound,
The House encore me so—

Nor any know I know the Art
I mention—easy—Here—
Nor any Placard boast me—
It’s full as Opera—

 

 

Equivalent No. 5, Adams County

Equivalent No. 5, Adams County

Equivalent No. 5, Adams County

I find substantial joy in the transformation of a series as it wends its way through its own artistic life. The Equivalent Series is as much as statement of development of vision as it is a group of statements (which I will leave a mystery, open to critical evaluation and interpretation) and examinations. The project has moved from one form to another; clouds and trees to lines and new organics. This one, No. 5, is just such a moment of change, but in my eye, poetically so.

The PlainSky, Nebraskans Show: The Complete Works No. 8

Change, Dawes County: The PlainSky, Nebraskans Show No. 7

Change, Dawes County: PlainSky, Nebraskans No. 7

This photograph deserves much of the credit for the entire PlainSky, Nebraskans project. It is the image that most defines the project’s commentary on the present and future of the High Plains.

Shot in Dawes County in 2010, I had walked through more than a half mile of high plains grass along the rails as I searched for a possible combination of graffiti, the distant Pine Ridge, and a farm or ranch to sit in the window created by the rails and coal cars. I was searching for a statement about the impending encroachment of industrialization and urbanization on the culture and landscape of western Nebraska, and when I found this car, “change” emblazoned on its flanks, a distant windmill and tractor against the Pine Ridge, and blackbirds on the fence, I began to compose. And as I worked to create the shot, the blackbirds departed and completed the scene.