Sammy Geisler, Bronc Rider


Sammy Geisler, Bronc Rider

Sammy Geisler, Bronc Rider

One of the best parts of my photographic life is the people I meet on the road at rodeos, county fairs, brandings, and elsewhere. Every story is interesting, for each life is different. But occasionally, one story stands out, a story that is vastly different than others. Sammy Geisler is just such a story, for in all my years shooting rodeos, I’ve never met anyone like her.

She’s a bronc rider. The only woman I’ve ever met who was.

In such a legacy sport nearly universally dominated by men, being a woman comes with an uphill battle for respect and recognition that’s tougher than the men have had to face. That means she’s tougher than nails, to say the least.

And I simply had to make a portrait of that brand of strength.

Trying on Hats, Eddyville Rodeo


Girls Trying on Hats, Eddyville

Girls Trying on Hats, Eddyville

I’ve been working on my Rural Rodeos project now—off and on, but mostly on—for 3 years. There are numerous reasons the project and book are important to me, but the largest is that it shows the intersections of tradition, modernity, and coming of age for everyone involved. These girls, trying on hats and making selfies at the Eddyville rodeo, struck me as symbolic of all three of the central themes of my work.

It’s been busy, so I’ve been away…but here’s a new photo to compensate.


Woman Traveler, Omaha

Airline Traveler, Omaha

It’s a tough thing, creativity. It comes and goes, and regardless of projects extant, oftentimes creativity is, as artist Chuck Close so eloquently said, difficult and inconsequential much of the time: “The advice I like to give young artists, or really anybody who’ll listen to me, is not to wait around for inspiration. Inspiration is for amateurs; the rest of us just show up and get to work.” So, I’ve been out sweating. Being inspired? Well, that too.

On To Photography Season!


Doors, St. Elmo

Doors, St. Elmo

The school year’s over, and except for a few meetings, a vast world of photography awaits me over the next 3 months! It’s my favorite time to shoot, since I can make good time in the field, make tens of thousands of images, and return to my photographic life. I’ll be working on a number of long-term and new ventures during this time, including my rural rodeos project, my abandoned project, and a new, super-secret project that will start appearing here in the next few weeks.

Until then, here’s one of my favorites from the Abandoned project: Doors, St. Elmo.

Remembering is My Livelihood at the Nebraska Cultural Endowment


Nebraska Cultural Endowment: Livelihood

Nebraska Cultural Endowment: Livelihood

There are surreal moments in a photographic life; after all, that life is often a solitary one, with long, quiet hours spent on the road, in the field, and in one’s own mind. After a time, it’s easy to begin thinking about the absurdity of those pursuits, the frivolity of such a life. But moments like this morning are very nice indeed, and they infuse me with energy for years to come.

Erin Sample, the communications director at the Nebraska Cultural Endowment, the partner organization to the Nebraska Arts Council (where my show Recollections is featuring through May), contacted me in late March and asked if she could feature me as one of their statewide “Livelihood” stories. I didn’t hesitate for a moment, for it is a profound honor. So I sent in my materials, and Erin worked with me to finalize the feature. And then I put it out of my mind, until Erin e-mailed me this morning: “Brett, the story’s up!”

I’ve had a lot—a LOT—of shows. I’ve given lots of talks. Each was an honor, too. But I’m so very moved to be featured in this way, and I’m emotionally and physically humbled as well, because I’m being included in a group of very, very impressive Nebraskans.

And I hope the Cultural Endowment doesn’t regret their decision.

Now Showing: Recollections at the Nebraska Arts Council


Recollections: Intuition

Recollections: Intuition

This show at the Nebraska Arts Council’s Fred Simon Gallery has been a long time coming, and like every show I’ve ever done, I’m terrified. I was awarded the show in 2013, and when it comes to this show, I’m in a very different place, artistically (and literally) speaking. Am I too “out there?” Will people not understand the work? Have I been too heavy-handed? These fears are exponentially larger this time, since the concept of the show is so much more complex. This one is…risky. Very risky.

So, either I’ll go down in flames, my photographic career languishing in Icarian glory, or I’ll still go down, but in a pallid hue of boring. But maybe, just maybe, there’s a chance I might get lucky and people will connect with the pieces and the show itself.

Here’s to hoping.

Recollections: Nostalgia (Part II of “The Ostensibility of Nostalgia” Diptych)


Nostalgia

Nostalgia

One of the great joys of my life is working with students, especially on thesis shows. The thesis is an exercise in artistic discovery, of artistic merit, and for artistic tenacity; the show that results is never the show that was planned. And that itself is the most rewarding moment for me in my own shows, too, the looking back on the long and unanticipated road traveled, all the while relishing the destination achieved.

This image is part of a diptych called “The Ostensibility of Nostalgia.” When this project began, I planned no such pieces, and looked for no paths to achieve them. But as I was recovering more pieces from one of the doomed homesteads that have provided many of the materials for the show, several artifacts spurred me to think in groups, in new concepts I hadn’t yet considered.

The show is better for it.

Recollections Preview: Intuition, nearly installed


Intuition

Intuition

The Recollections show opens in less than one month (April 20), with the reception on May 1 from 5–7. The pieces are composed and prepared, and now mounting and construction will begin in earnest.

Here’s a preview of Intuition under construction.

Recollections No. 8: “Ostension”


Ostension

Ostension

“I felt…cold,” she said. “Like I wasn’t alone.”

“So you’ve seen her,” the night clerk chuckled.

“Don’t you know the old Jones place is haunted?” she shivered.

“Something awful happened in the barn, and they didn’t want it haunting the ranch,” he warned.

We have all felt it, or at least thought we have. Some may have seen it, or heard it, or dreamt it. But the reality is that our reality is punctuated with the untouchable, the unseeable, and the unexplainable.

Recollections No. 7: “Orthodoxy”


Orthodoxy

Orthodoxy

I have photographed this bleak outpost in the openness of Wyoming more times than I can count, often from the same angle, but with different lenses, different weather, different techniques and different light. Yet the building remains the foundation of all the images, the solidity of thought within my eidetic soul. What might be if I swayed from this spot? This place? This commitment?